Hamlet Soliloquy Essay Introduction

Hamlet Resources

Please see the main Hamlet page for the complete play with explanatory notes and study questions for each scene.

 Introduction to Hamlet
 Hamlet: Problem Play and Revenge Tragedy
 The Hamlet and Ophelia Subplot
 The Norway Subplot in Hamlet
 Introduction to the Characters in Hamlet

 Hamlet Plot Summary
 The Purpose of The Murder of Gonzago
 The Dumb-Show: Why Hamlet Reveals his Knowledge to Claudius
 The Elder Hamlet: The Kingship of Hamlet's Father
 Hamlet's Relationship with the Ghost

 Philological Examination Questions on Hamlet
 Quotations from Hamlet (with commentary)
 Hamlet Study Quiz (with detailed answers)
 Analysis of I am sick at heart (1.1)
 Hamlet: Q & A

 Soliloquy Analysis: O this too too... (1.2)
 Soliloquy Analysis: O, what a rogue and peasant slave am I!... (2.2)
 Soliloquy Analysis: To be, or not to be... (3.1)
 Soliloquy Analysis: Tis now the very witching time of night... (3.2)
 Soliloquy Analysis: Now might I do it pat... (3.3)
 Soliloquy Analysis: How all occasions do inform against me... (4.4)

 Ophelia's Burial and Christian Rituals
 The Baker's Daughter: Ophelia's Nursery Rhymes
 Hamlet as National Hero
 Claudius and the Condition of Denmark

 In Secret Conference: The Meeting Between Claudius and Laertes
 O Jephthah - Toying with Polonius
 The Death of Polonius and its Impact on Hamlet's Character
 Blank Verse and Diction in Shakespeare's Hamlet

 Hamlet Essay Topics
 Hamlet's Silence
 An Excuse for Doing Nothing: Hamlet's Delay
 Foul Deeds Will Rise: Hamlet and Divine Justice
 Defending Claudius - The Charges Against the King
 Shakespeare's Fools: The Grave-Diggers in Hamlet

 Hamlet's Humor: The Wit of Shakespeare's Prince of Denmark
 All About Yorick
 Hamlet's Melancholy: The Transformation of the Prince
 Hamlet's Antic Disposition: Is Hamlet's Madness Real?

 The Significance of the Ghost in Armor
 The Significance of Ophelia's Flowers
 Ophelia and Laertes
 Mistrusted Love: Ophelia and Polonius

 Divine Providence in Hamlet
 What is Tragic Irony?
 Seneca's Tragedies and the Elizabethan Drama
 Shakespeare's Sources for Hamlet

 Characteristics of Elizabethan Tragedy
 Why Shakespeare is so Important
 Shakespeare's Language
 Shakespeare's Influence on Other Writers

In the Spotlight


Quote in Context

O, what a rogue and peasant slave am I!
Is it not monstrous that this player here,
But in a fiction, in a dream of passion,
Could force his soul so to his own conceit
That from her working all his visage wann'd,
Tears in his eyes, distraction in's aspect,
A broken voice, and his whole function suiting
With forms to his conceit? and all for nothing!
For Hecuba!
                                                           Hamlet (2.2), Hamlet

In addition to revealing Hamlet's plot to catch the king in his guilt, Hamlet's second soliloquy uncovers the very essence of Hamlet's true conflict. For he is undeniably committed to seeking revenge for his father, yet he cannot act on behalf of his father due to his revulsion toward extracting that cold and calculating revenge. Read on...

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Hamlet History

King Claudius. Our son shall win.
Queen Gertrude. He's fat, and scant of breath.
                                                     Hamlet (5.2)

Gertrude's startling description of her son is not quite what we modern readers have in mind when envisioning the brooding young Prince Hamlet. But how can we explain the Queen's frank words? There is evidence to believe that Shakespeare had to work around the rotund stature of his good friend Richard Burbage, the first actor to play Hamlet. "As he was a portly man of large physique, it was natural that the strenuous exertion bring out the fact that he was fat or out of training, as well as scant of breath....He was the first and the last fat Hamlet" (Blackmore, Riddles of Hamlet). An elegy written upon Burbage's death in 1619 convincingly ties "King Dick", as he was affectionately called by his fellow actors, to the line in question:
No more young Hamlet, though but scant of breath, Shall cry Revenge! for his dear father's death.
                                            (A Funeral Elegy)
It is natural to wonder why the death of Burbage was a national tragedy, while the passing of Shakespeare himself just three years earlier received such little attention. There seems, however, to be a simple answer. Read on...
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+ All Hamlet Soliloquy Essays:

  • The Character of Gertrude in Shakespeare’s Hamlet
  • Gibson and Branagh in the Movie Versions of Shakespeare’s Hamlet
  • Hamlet and the Issue of Revenge in William Shakespeare's Play
  • Hamlet: An Existential Tragedy
  • Hamlet -- Is Hamlet Sane
  • Hamlet's Madness in William Shakespeare's Hamlet
  • Claudius of Shakespeare's Hamlet
  • “Literary Techniques Used in Hamlet”, by William Shakespeare
  • The Many Identities of Hamlet in Hamlet by William Shakespeare
  • How Shakespeare Portrays Madness in Hamlet
  • The Ambiguity of Shakespeare's Ambiguous Hamlet
  • The Role of Deception in Hamlet
  • Shakespeare's Hamlet - Gertrude
  • Hamlet by William Shakespeare
  • Slaughterhouse Five and Hamlet
  • Shakespeare's Hamlet - Regarding Gertrude
  • Doubt in Hamlet
  • Hamlet the Central Dilemma
  • relationships in Hamlet
  • Shakespeare’s Hamlet
  • The Impact of Ophelia on Shakespeare's Hamlet
  • Religion in Hamlet
  • Timeless Aspects of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark and Trifles
  • Love and Sexuality in Hamlet
  • The Character Horatio in Shakespeare's Hamlet
  • Scenes in Shakespeare's Hamlet
  • Character of Hamlet
  • Shakespeare's Hamlet: Hamlet is Perfectly Sane
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  • The Spiritual Dimension of Hamlet
  • Hamlet: Analytical Essay About Style
  • The Character of Gertrude in Shakespeare’s Hamlet
  • A Questionnaire on Shakespeare's 'Hamlet'
  • A Comparison of Macbeth and Hamlet
  • Comparing Shakespeare's Hamlet and Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead
  • Revenge and Vengeance in Shakespeare's Hamlet - Beyond Vengeance
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  • Hamlet- The Role Of Women
  • Soliolquy in Shakespeare´s Hamlet and The Reverger´s Tragedy
  • The Characters Traits of Hamlet
  • The Use of Soliloquies in William Shakespeare's Othello
  • Hamlet and Horatio
  • Hamlet - He Loves Her? He Loves Her Not?
  • Custom Essays: Imagination versus Realism in Hamlet
  • The Human Condition and Ideologies in Hamlet by Willliam Shakespeare
  • Theme of Revenge in Shakespeare's Hamlet
  • Hamlet and the Psychological Approach
  • Crawling Inside the Mind of Shakespeare's Hamlet
  • Revenge in Shakespeare's Hamlet
  • Hamlet: A Moral Man
  • Claudius in William Shakespeare's Hamlet
  • Indecision, Hesitation and Delay in Shakespeare's Hamlet - Procrastination and Indecision
  • Hamlet and the Oedipus Complex
  • Comparing Frances Zefferilli’s Hamlet and Shakespeare’s Hamlet
  • Coleridge's View on Iago's Soliloquies
  • Hamlet Theme Family
  • The Effects of Hamlet's Indecisiveness in William Shakespeare’s play, The Tragedy of Hamlet
  • Love and Passion in Hamlet by William Shakespeare
  • A Comparison of Shakespeare's Prince Hamlet and Machiavelli’s The Prince
  • Characteristics of a Machiavel in The Spanish Tragedy and Hamlet
  • Analysis of Hamlet
  • Disease, Sickness, Death, and Decay in Hamlet
  • Suicide in Hamlet
  • Hamlet and Horatio Best Friends for Life: an Analysis of Hamlet
  • Analysis of Hamlet
  • Problems in the Revenge Tragedy: William Shakespeare's Hamlet
  • Hamlet by William Shakespeare
  • Hamlet as a Man of Inaction
  • Heroes and Revenge in Hamlet and The Spanish Tragedy
  • Irony in Hamlet
  • William Shakespeare's Hamlet as a Revenge Tragedy
  • Hamlet - a Universal Man
  • Hamlet : Fortinbras Importance
  • The Effectiveness Of The Opening To Hamlet
  • Iago's Soliloquy Analysis
  • Hamlet confrontation
  • Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead versus Hamlet
  • Hamlet by William Shakespeare
  • Contrast Between Hamlet, Laertes and Fortinbras
  • An Analysis of Queen Gertrudes Position in King Hamlets Death in William Shakespeare's Hamlet
  • Fortinbras as Foil for Shakespeare's Hamlet
  • Claudius Soliloquy Act 3, Scene 3
  • Hamlet and the Yellow Wallpaper
  • Define Revenge in Hamlet
  • Hamlet

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