Elfrida Vipont Bibliography Website

Influence Links Of The Third Wave Movement
compiled by Deception In The Church

INDEX

Influences Chart

(a) Gnosticism
(b) Mystical Eastern Religion
(c) Pelegianism
(d) New Thought Movement
(e) Shamanism
(f) Arminianism
(g) Christian Science
(h) Mesmerism
(i) Spiritism/Spiritualism
(j) George Fox
(k) Azusa Street Revival
(l) Quakers
(m) Pentecostals
(n) Assemblies Of God
(o) Oneness Pentecostals
(p) Charles Parham
(q) United Pentecostals
(r) Gunner Payne
(s) Word-Faith Movement
(t) William Branham
(u) Essek Kenyon
(v) Kenneth Hagin
(w) Kenneth Copeland
(x) Baptist
(y) Roman Catholic
(z) Latter Rain
(aa) Manifest Sons Of God
(bb) Kingdom Now
(cc) Reconstructionism
(dd) Aimee Semple McPherson
(ee) Joel's Army
(ff) Kathryn Kuhlman
(gg) John Avanzini
(hh) Benny Hinn
(ii) Paul Crouch
(jj) Morris Cerullo
(kk) Calvary Chapel
(ll) Marilyn Hickey
(mm) Rodney Howard-Browne
(nn) Randy Clark
(oo) Paul Cain
(pp) John Wimber
(qq) Kansas City Prophets
(rr) Vineyard
(ss) Rick Joyner
(tt) Bob Jones
(uu) John Arnott
(vv) Jack Deere
(ww) Sandy Millar
(xx) Steve Hill
(zz) John Kilpatrick


(a) Gnosticism

BRIEF HISTORY

GNOSIS is a Greek work that means knowledge, in particular, "Revelation knowledge", hidden truths that are revealed supernaturally to the initiate. The Gnostics of old had certain central beliefs and these are now coming to the surface again today."

DEFINITION

The "Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church" defines gnosticism thus:

A religious movement in which central importance was attached to the gnosis, or revelation knowledge, of God and of the origin and destiny of mankind. The source of this special gnosis or knowledge was held to be either the Apostles from whom it was derived by a secret tradition, or by a direct revelation."

HERETICAL DOCTRINES

The goal was to attain self-awareness as a spiritual being, and god-consciousness. The true world is spirit, and the material realm is a snare from which we must escape. All men possess a divine spark, a part of the divine being, which fell from the transcendent realm into the material universe, and was imprisoned in human bodies. Reawakened by knowledge, the divine element in humanity can return to its proper home in the transcendent spiritual realm. Gnostics knew nothing of the redemption of the body. Their hope was in the transformation of the soul!

Characteristic of the gnostic teaching was that the material creation was antagonistic to what is truly spiritual, but that each man had a spark or seed of the divine substance within. Through the secret doctrines and the rites associated with them, this divine spark might be rescued from its evil material environment and be reunited with the divine.

- Hymns and magic formulas were recited to help achieve a vision of God.

- Wine and drugs were used to open up the mind to the spirit realm.

Gnosticism existed before the time of Christ's birth, but afterwards there were Christian Gnostics. They explained the phenomenon of Jesus Christ in this way:

The christ spirit simply inhabited the body of the man Jesus. The christ spirit had come to teach man the gnosis whereby he could free himself from bondage to the evil material world. Some even taught that Jesus did not actually have a body of flesh, but was pure spirit. Thus the ideas of physical death and resurrection were denied by the gnostics.

How did so-called "christian" Gnostics deal with scripture, and the reality of God Almighty?

- Gnostics rejected the literal and traditional interpretations of the Gospels

- Gnostics rejected the God of the Old Testament as a despot trying to keep us in bondage to this world. - The Creator God, to the Gnostics, was not the Supreme Being, but a secondary being who had fallen from the pure spiritual realm of the Supreme Being. This creator god (the demiurge, or craftsman) was the architect of the universe but his mistake was to imprison men in earth-bound bodies and apply to them the bondage of Law. Gnostics sought to escape, through superior wisdom, the rule of this god, and rise to spiritual intimacy with the Supreme Being, the centre of all being. Thus, they did not accept the Law of God. They were in essence lawlesss. (Tricia Tillin, THE NEW THING - Part One. Global Revival as the Key Element In Deception in Twentieth Century Pentecostalism, 1997,  http://www.banner.org.uk/res/newthing_cont.html )

For an excellent booklet on Christian Gnosticism, read the article "Strange Fire: The Rise of Gnosticism in the Church" by Travers and Jewel van der Merwe, 1995 located online at: http://www.ncinter.net/~ejt/gnostic1.htm

MAJOR ADHERANTS

Simon Magus, a famous magician who lived during the reign of Claudius Caesar, possibly Simon The Sorcerer of Acts (Paul Trejo at: http://www.webcom.com/gnosis/simon.magus.bio.html)
Valentinius, the philosopher 
Apollonius of Tyana (The Gnostics, Anders Sandberg, http://www.student.nada.kth.se/~nv91-asa/Mage/gnostics.html)

LINKS

New Thought Movement

"EXAMPLES OF ILLUMINISM: Mystery cults such as the Egyptian, (the worship of Isis, the veiled goddess); And also Greek Mystery religions; Freemasonry and suchlike orders. EG Templars, Rosicrucians, Priory of Zion; Alchemy and the search for the Grail:

"In the book, "A Dictionary of Alchemy" by Mark Haeffner, he says this: "The old view of alchemists as seeking after the elixir of life, or touchstone for transmuting metals into gold is totally inadequate. Alchemical roots go back to primitive mythology; and its adepts treated alchemy as both a scientific, experimental tradition and a mystic wisdom tradition in which there was a confluence of gnostic ideas about man and nature Alchemy always has a strong element of magic and of mysticism. The experimental physical aspect seems to be an introduction to mystic, magical secrets about the transformation of the spirit."

"Also in New Age Theosophy, based on Mdme Blavatsky and Alice Bailey. Later, found in the doctrines of "New Thought" which led to Christian Science and Word of Faith doctrines." (Tom Smith, Background To The "Holy Laughter" Movement, 1997, http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/4948/vine3is5.html)

Latter Rain Movement

"The doctrines of gnosticism are taught by a ruling caste, an elite who have ascended above the mere mental realm and who possess the wisdom of the ancients - new agers calls them Ascended Masters. The Latter Rain calls them the Apostles and Prophets, but they have the same end in view - a teaching of the hidden secrets of God, the revelations that will lead us to liberation. In the case of the Latter Rain and toronto teachings, these "masters" are the conduits through which the anointing flows, as well as the verbal mouthpieces of the hidden wisdom. Thus they become both guru and shaman at once." (Tricia Tillin, THE NEW THING - Part One. Global Revival as the Key Element In Deception in Twentieth Century Pentecostalism, 1997,  http://www.banner.org.uk/res/newthing_cont.html )

Word-Faith Movement

"... it can be shown that Word of Faith does hold to gnosticism in some degree: the true man is spirit, not flesh; we can rise above sin, sickness and even death, to a life of the spirit; we can overcome this fallen world - not by the life of Jesus, the Tree of Life, but by the Tree of hidden Wisdom, through the possession and use of words - which have creative power to release us from the material world; ultimately we become so glorified that we are transformed into spiritual-beings." (Tricia Tillin, THE NEW THING - Part One. Global Revival as the Key Element In Deception in Twentieth Century Pentecostalism, 1997,  http://www.banner.org.uk/res/newthing_cont.html )


(b) Mystical Eastern Religion

BRIEF HISTORY

Mystical Eastern religions have been around since the time of the tower of Babel, when the peoples who dispersed toward the East took their gods and religions with them.

DEFINITION

mys·ti·cism
Pronunciation: `mis-t&-"si-z&m
Function: noun
Date: 1736

1 : the experience of mystical union or direct communion with ultimate reality reported by mystics

2 : the belief that direct knowledge of God, spiritual truth, or ultimate reality can be attained through subjective experience (as intuition or insight)

3 a : vague speculation : a belief without sound basis b : a theory postulating the possibility of direct and intuitive acquisition of ineffable knowledge or power

"Mysticism in which knowledge of the true self and the true secret doctrines is attained by a mystical experience of the divine." (Webster's Dictionary)

HERETICAL DOCTRINES

Examples of mystical rites:

- Catholic mysticism, with trances states, levitation and visions of angels

- New Age and eastern mysticism, meditation, trances, sleep and sensory deprivation, etc

- Yoga, chanting, dancing, - tribal rites

- Rock music, other forms of trance-inducing music, disco-dancing, head-banging, shaking, whirling dervishes

- Drugs, especially hallucinogenic drugs such as LSD

- Apparitions, visions, encounters with aliens from UFO's

- Prolonged fasting and prayer, with meditation (Tricia Tillin, THE NEW THING - Part One. Global Revival as the Key Element In Deception in Twentieth Century Pentecostalism, 1997,  http://www.banner.org.uk/res/newthing_cont.html )

MAJOR ADHERANTS

Sai Baba, eastern fakir
Bagwan Sri Rajneesh, deceased yogi
Budhists
Hindus

LINKS

Shamanism

"Shamanic ecstasy is the real "Old Time Religion," of which modern churches are but pallid evocations. Shamanic, visionary ecstasy, the mysterium tremendum, the unio mystica, the eternally delightful experience of the universe as energy, is a sine qua non of religion, it is what religion is for! There is no need for faith, it is the ecstatic experience itself that gives one faith in the intrinsic unity and integrity of the universe, in ourselves as integral parts of the whole; that reveals to us the sublime majesty of our universe, and the fluctuant, scintillant, alchemical miracle that is quotidian consciousness. Any religion that requires faith and gives none, that defends against religious experiences, that promulgates the bizarre superstition that humankind is in some way separate, divorced from the rest of creation, that heals not the gaping wound between Body and Soul, but would tear them asunder... is no religion at all!" (Jonathan Ott, http://deoxy.org/shaman.htm, 1997)

John Wimber/Vineyard/Third Wave

"John Wimber's teachings about "paradigm shifts" and "worldviews" are very similar to those in the New Age movement, which seeks to draw people into Eastern mysticism. New Age philosophy also attacks Christianity as being a product of Western "rationalism" and "scientism" in its attempts to shift people's thinking away from rational thought to the non-rational base associated with Eastern religions. It is also comparable in most ways to the blind leap of faith into a non-reasoned relgious experience of existentialism. True Christianity never includes the demand for a non-reasoned blind leap of faith. Paul said," I know whom I have believed in ...". This concept originated with the Babylonian Mystery religions and were require for the initiate to enter into the deeper mysteries of this mother of all false religions and heresy. If you have not had the chance to read Hysop's "The Two Babylon's' ", I encourage you to purchase that book and investigate for your self the bizarre connection with the present day and the days of Nimrod."  (Testing The Fruit Of The Vineyard, John Goodwin, Pastor, Solid Rock Christian Fellowship, http://www.deceptioninthechurch.com/KJCVINEY.HTM) 


(c) Pelegianism

BRIEF HISTORY

Early in the Fifth century, an English lawyer and moralist, Pelagius sought to reform the Roman Catholic Church in Europe. His concern justifiably centered on the behavior of morally lax clergy and church members who used the fact of human frailty as license for immorality. He and his followers became the life-long theological antagonists of Augustine, Bishop of Hippo (354-430), who sought to defend the truth of man's ruin at the Fall as recorded by God in the Bible.

By the end of the Fifth century, through a process of compromise and conciliation with the teachings of the Bible, Pelagianism spawned Semi-Pelagianism. It has been described by Dr. Kenneth Good in these words:

"Though it retained much of the philosophical basis of its parent (Pelagianism), as opposed to divine revelation (i.e. the Bible), Semi-Pelagianism compromised with truth sufficiently to gain favorable audience with some Christians. It became, thus, a far more dangerous form of infidelity than its parent. As such, it eventually overcame the Roman Catholic Church and returned it to the very Pelagianism condemned by Augustine. Semi-Pelagianism changed its disguise and further altered its voice at a later date to become known as Arminianism, following some scholastic refinements and adjustments to Christianity. (Good, Kenneth H., Are Baptists Calvinists?, Oberlin, OH, 1975, Regular Baptist Heritage Fellowship)

HERETICAL DOCTRINES

Pelagius taught that man did not inherit Adam's propensity toward sin, possessed free will, and consequently constructed a system of rationalistic moralism. While accepting the Bible's account of Adam and Eve, but relying on reason and experience, he insisted that a good and just God would not command of fallen man that which was impossible and that anyone could live free from sin, if they just chose to. According to Pelagius, man was autonomous, unhindered, and free to choose for or against God. Further, he also erroneously believed that man's mental abilities were unaffected by the Fall.

MAJOR ADHERANTS

Pelegius, originator of this doctrine
Roman Catholic Church
John Wimber

LINKS

Arminianism

"... in rejecting the excesses of Calvinism, and in the attempt to construct his own system of beliefs, Arminius drew upon both Semi-Pelagianism and the Bible to create a new theological hybrid subsequently dubbed Arminianism." (The Unholy Alliance, Dan S., 1997)

John Wimber

"He holds a radical Arminianism (some might well argue it is Pelagianism). Wimber seems to have little or no appreciation of the doctrine of the Fall and speaks of being involved in "restoring the Edenic state" in and through his ministry." (Assessing the Wimber Phenomenon, Dr. Don Lewis)

Roman Catholic Church

"Though it retained much of the philosophical basis of its parent (Pelagianism), as opposed to divine revelation (i.e. the Bible), Semi-Pelagianism compromised with truth sufficiently to gain favorable audience with some Christians. It became, thus, a far more dangerous form of infidelity than its parent. As such, it eventually overcame the Roman Catholic Church and returned it to the very Pelagianism condemned by Augustine. (Good, Kenneth H., Are Baptists Calvinists?, Oberlin, OH, 1975, Regular Baptist Heritage Fellowship) 


(d) New Thought Movement

BRIEF HISTORY

The movement originated in 19th Century New England, and is now worldwide. New Thought includes Divine Science, Religious Science (Science of Mind), Seicho-No-Ie, Unity, and other groups. From its early writings to its current use of process philosophy, it consciously has incorporated Eastern and Western insights. Phineas Parkhurst Quimby generally is recognized as the "Father of New Thought." He transmitted his views to patients Warren Felt Evans, Mary Baker Eddy, and Julius and Annetta Dresser.

HERETICAL DOCTRINES

New Thought is a popular application of philosophical idealism, optimistic mental discipline, and the practice of the presence of God in healing and in daily living.

New Thought metaphysics in its various forms combines (1) Hindu-like, world-denying pantheism and (2) Western, largely Christian, recognition of the reality of the world as divine creation, with matter a name for certain mental experiences.

Influenced by quantum physics as well as philosophy, Process New Thought:

(1) replaces the idea of enduring thing-like substance with process, understood as living energy, activity, feeling;

(2) maintains that there is only one type of reality, called mental or spiritual, but

(3) recognizes that there are many units of it.

(4) Each unit is an experience that develops for only a fraction of a second. Then it becomes a changeless part of the past, exerting influence on future experiences.

(5) Each experience co-creates itself with God by blending the influence of the past with individually-tailored divine guidance: PAST + DIVINE PROPOSAL (God's offer of perfection as expressible in that situation) + CHOICE = NEW CREATION.

(6) This pattern or law (an abstraction summarizing how reality works) is changeless, since it is a description of the essence of reality; but laws of nature are habits of interaction that may change over vast periods of time. Laws do not act. They are only descriptions. Like Buddhism, process thought believes in process rather than substance, but

(7) Process thought agrees with Christian and other Western emphasis on God as the ultimate person.

(8) In order to be fully impartial, God has to be fully personal, i.e., self-conscious, rational, and powerfully, alluringly, purposeful. God is not human, but is the infinite person; we are finite persons.

(9) God plays an essential role in creativity, which could not occur without God's offer of the best that is possible for each experience.

(10) All creating is co-creating; there was no original creation.

(11) Process New Thought's panentheism considers everything to be in God; as the INTA Declaration of Principles says, the universe is God's body.

(12) In serial selfhood, a human body is a vast collection of many-at-a-time servant-experiences that are subordinate to the one-at-a-time selves that make up one's soul (mind, spirit, whatever of oneself is not body). (Alan Anderson, The New Thought Movement: A Link Between East And West, 1993, http://websyte.com/alan/parlsum.htm)

MAJOR ADHERANTS

Divine Science
Religious Science (Science of Mind) 
Seicho-No-Ie
Unity

LINKS

Christian Science

"Phineas Parkhurst Quimby generally is recognized as the "Father of New Thought." He transmitted his views to patients Warren Felt Evans, Mary Baker Eddy (Founder of Christian Science), and Julius and Annetta Dresser." (Alan Anderson, The New Thought Movement: A Link Between East And West, 1993, http://websyte.com/alan/parlsum.htm)

Many of the current New Age teachings can find their historical roots in the Christian Science and New Thought movements. (The Watchman Expositor, Index Of Cults, 1997, http://www.watchman.org/cat954.htm#ChristSci)

"Christian Science and the New Thought agree that all life is one; that God is all in all; that all intelligence is one. And they disagree on the following points: Christian Science says the visible world is mortal mind; the New Thought declares the universe to be an expression of God's work. Christian Science asserts that sin, sickness, and death have no existence. The New Thought affirms that they have an existence; but that their existence is only limited and their destruction comes through right thinking and hence right living." This show a digression from New Thought to Christian Science regarding the doctrines of God and sin and a further departure of Christian Science from orthodox Christian doctrines. (The Confusion Of Tongues, Charles W. Ferguson, 1927, p. 171; with comment by Sandy Simpson)


(e) Shamanism

BRIEF HISTORY

"The word "shaman" comes to English from the Tungus language via Russian. Among the Tungus of Siberia it is both a noun and a verb. While the Tungus have no word for shamanism, it has come into usage by anthropologists, historians of religion and others in contemporary society to designate the experience and the practices of the shaman. Its usage has grown to include similar experiences and practices in cultures outside of the original Siberian cultures from which the term shaman originated. (Dean Edwards, Shamanism-General Overview-Preface, 1997, originally at http://www.webcom.com/gspirit/Shaman/shamanov.html now here.)

Shamanism is classified by anthropologists as an archaic magico-religious phenomenon in which the shaman is the great master of ecstasy. Shamanism itself, was defined by the late Mircea Eliade as a technique of ecstasy. A shaman may exhibit a particular magical specialty (such as control over fire, wind or magical flight). When a specialization is present the most common is as a healer. The distinguishing characteristic of shamanism is its focus on an ecstatic trance state in which the soul of the shaman is believed to leave the body and ascend to the sky (heavens) or descend into the earth (underworld). The shaman makes use of spirit helpers, with whom he or she communicates, all the while retaining control over his or her own consciousness. (Examples of possession occur, but are the exception, rather than the rule.) It is also important to note that while most shamans in traditional societies are men, either women or men may and have become shamans. (Dean Edwards, Shamanism-General Overview-Preface, 1997, originally available at http://www.webcom.com/gspirit/Shaman/so.shamanism.html but now avialable here.)

DEFINITION

sha·man·ism
Pronunciation: -"ni-z&m
Function: noun
Date: 1780
: a religion practiced by indigenous peoples of far northern Europe and Siberia that is characterized by belief in an unseen world of gods, demons, and ancestral spirits responsive only to the shamans; also : any similar religion
- sha·man·ist /-nist/ noun
- sha·man·is·tic /"shä-m&-'nis-tik, "shA-m&-/ adjective (Webster's Dictionary)

HERETICAL DOCTRINES

One becomes a shaman by one of three methods:

a) Hereditary transmission

b) Spontaneous selection or `call' or `election'

c) personal choice and quest. (This latter method is less frequent and traditionally such a shaman is considered less powerful than one selected by one of the two preceding methods.) The shaman is not recognized as legitimate without having undergone two types of training:

1) Ecstatic (dreams, trances, etc.)

2) Traditional ("shamanic techniques, names and functions of spirits, mythology and genealogy of the clan, secret language, etc.) The two-fold course of instruction, given by the spirits and the old master shamans is equivalent to an initiation." It is also possible for the entire process to take place in the dream state or in ecstatic experience. (Mircea Eliade, The Encyclopedia of Religion, v. 13 , p. 202. Mcmillian, N.Y., 1987.)

MAJOR ADHERANTS

Nikolai Agitshev, son of an Ostyak-Samoyedic Siberian shaman
Medicine men, mediums and witch doctors in all cultures

LINKS

Mesmerism

The term Mesmerism eventually became analogous with hypnosis and was linked with both Spiritualism and the Mind Science religions. (The Watchman Expositor, Index Of Cults, 1997, http://www.watchman.org/cat952.htm)

Spiritism

Spiritualism is a movement that began in the last half of the 1800's. A form of Spiritism normally associated with mediums or channelers who contact the spirits of the deceased. (The Watchman Expositor, Index Of Cults, 1997, http://www.watchman.org/cat953.htm)


(f) Arminianism

BRIEF HISTORY

Although trained in the reformed tradition, Arminius had serious doubts about the doctrine of "sovereign grace" as taught by the followers of John Calvin. He was a pastor of the Reformed congregation in Amsterdam (1588), but during his fifteen years of ministry there, he began to question any of the conclusions of Calvinism. He left the pastorate and became professor of theology at the University of Leyden. It was his series of lectures on election and predestination that led to a violent and tragic controversy. After his death in 1609, his followers developed the Remonstrance of 1610 which outlined the "Five Points of Arminianism." This document was a protest against the doctrines of the Calvinists, and was, submitted to the State of Holland. In 1618, a National Synod of the Church was convened in Dort to examine the teachings or Arminius in the light of Scripture. After 154 sessions, lasting seven months, the Five Points of Arminianism were declared to be heretical. After the synod, many of the disciples of Arminius, such as Hugo Grotius, were imprisoned or banished. When John Wesley took up some of the teachings of Arminianism, the movement began to grow, and it affected the Methodist tradition as well as the beliefs of most Pentecostal and Charismatic churches.

Arminianism is mentioned here mainly as a link to the Azusa Street Revival, being a factor behind the Pentecostal and charismatic movement that came out of it. Hyper-Arminians and hyper-Calvinists are more rare these days in othodox Christianity. Most mailine Christians subscribe to some points from both doctrines or even, in some cases, that parts of both doctrines are somehow, though apparently opposite logically, paradoxically true. The problem with straight Arminianism is that it ascribes too much power to the creatures and not enough to the Creator. It also is heretical in its belief that there is some good in man and that the "fall" was not complete.

CONTRAST OF DOCTRINES

The "Five Points of Arminianism" and the "TULIP" of Calvanism are contrasted point by point:

ARMINIANISM - FREE WILL

Arminius believed that the fall of man was not total, maintaining that there was enough good left in man for him to will to accept Jesus Christ unto salvation.

CALVANISM - "T" = TOTAL DEPRAVITY

The Calvinists believed that man is in absolute bondage to sin and Satan, unable to exercise his own will to trust in Jesus Christ without the help of God.

ARMINIANISM - CONDITIONAL ELECTION

Arminius believed that election was based on the foreknowledge of God as to who would believe. Man's "act of faith" was seen as the "condition" or his being elected to eternal life, since God foresaw him exercising his free will" in response to Jesus Christ.

CALVANISM - "U" = UNCONDITIONAL ELECTION

The Calvinists believed that foreknowledge is based upon the plan and purpose of God, and that election is not based upon the decision of man, but the "free will" of the Creator alone.

ARMINIANISM - UNIVERSAL ATONEMENT

Arminius held that redemption was based on the fact that God loves everybody, that Christ died for everyone, and that the Father is not willing that any should perish. The death of Christ provided the grounds for God to save all men, but each must exercise his own "free will" in order to be saved.

CALVANISM - "L" = LIMITED ATONEMENT

The Calvinists believed that Jesus Christ died to save those who were given to Him by the Father in eternity past. In their view, all for whom Jesus died (the elect) will be saved, and all for whom He did not die (the non elect) will be lost.

ARMINIANISM - OBSTRUCTABLE GRACE

Arminius believed that since God wanted all men to be saved, He sent the Holy Spirit to "woo" all men to Christ, but since man has absolute "free will," he is able to resist God's will for his life. He believed that God's will to save all men can be frustrated by the finite will of man. He also taught that man exercises his own will first, and then is born again.

CALVANISM - "I" = IRRESISTIBLE GRACE

The Calvinists believed that the Lord possesses irresistible grace that cannot be obstructed. They taught that the free will of man is so far removed from salvation, that the elect are regenerated (made spiritually alive) by God even before expressing faith in Jesus Christ for salvation. If a totally depraved person wasn't made alive by the Holy Spirit, such a calling on God would be impossible.

ARMINIANISM - FALLING FROM GRACE

If man cannot be saved by God unless it is man's will to be saved, then man cannot continue in salvation unless he continues to will to be saved.

CALVANISM - "P" = PERSEVERANCE OF THE SAINTS

The Calvinists believed that salvation is entirely the work of the Lord, and that man has absolutely nothing to do with the process. The saints will persevere because God will see to it that He will finish the work He has begun.

LINKS

Azusa Street Revival

"After working with (Charles) Parham for a short time in Texas, (William J.) Seymor moved on to Los Angeles, California where he established the beginning foundation of the movement. Seymor was based in the Azusa Street Mission which became known as the center of Pentecostalism and its main location of growth and expansion ... Arminianism is strongly held in many (Pentecostal and charismatic) groups ... " (Michael R. Ramos, Pentecostals, Charismatics, and the Third Wave, 1997, http://www.leaderu.com/isot/docs/3wave.html)


(g) Christian Science

BRIEF HISTORY

Mary Baker Eddy, founded the Christian Science Church in 1879. Her book Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, first published in 1875, was named in 1992 as one of the 75 books by women whose words have changed the world. The Mother Church, The First Church of Christ, Scientist, is located in Boston, Mass. USA. (Committee on Publication for Victoria, Christian Science, 1997, http://yarra.vicnet.net.au/~cscience/CSMenu.html)

HERETICAL DOCTRINES

- Believes that the idea of the Trinity is polytheistic.

- Teaches the Godhead is composed of God the Father-Mother, Christ the spiritual idea of sonship and the Holy Ghost is the Divine Science or Christian Science.

- They make a distinction between Jesus the man and Christ the Divine Idea.

- Jesus simply possessed and demonstrated the Christ Idea or Consciousness to a greater extent than other humans. However, all humans posses the Christ-consciousness.

- Matter, Sin, Sickness and Death are all illusions.

- Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures is their main text. Many of the current New Age teachings can find their historical roots in the Christian Science and New Thought movements. (The Watchman Expositor, Index Of Cults, 1997, http://www.watchman.org/cat954.htm#ChristSci)

"Important Points", not a "doctrines" list, from their home page:

1. As adherents of Truth, we take the inspired Word of the Bible as our sufficient guide to eternal Life.

2. We acknowledge and adore one supreme and infinite God. We acknowledge His Son, one Christ; the Holy Ghost or divine Comforter; and man in God's image and likeness.

3. We acknowledge God's forgiveness of sin in the destruction of sin and the spiritual understanding that casts out evil as unreal. But the belief in sin is punished so long as the belief lasts.

4. We acknowledge Jesus' atonement as the evidence of divine, efficacious Love, unfolding man's unity with God through Christ Jesus the Way-shower; and we acknowledge that man is saved through Christ, through Truth, Life, and Love as demonstrated by the Galilean Prophet in healing the sick and overcoming sin and death.

5. We acknowledge that the crucifixion of Jesus and his resurrection served to uplift faith to understand eternal Life, even the allness of Soul, Spirit, and the nothingness of matter.

6. And we solemnly promise to watch, and pray for that Mind to be in us which was also in Christ Jesus; to do unto others as we would have them do unto us; and to be merciful, just, and pure. (From Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures, page 496)

MAJOR ADHERANTS

Mary Baker Eddy, founder

LINKS

Word-Faith Movement

"... the real father of the `Faith' message is E.W.Kenyon, who was teaching the same things before Kenneth Hagin was even born (Kenyon died in 1948). To the casual observer, the `Faith' movement has certain similarities in experience, etc., to the Pentecostal and charismatic movements. However, the core of the message, and its origins, are widely divergent. Kenyon, its founder, inadvertently `borrowed' from the ideas taught by Christian Science, New Thought and Unity School of Christianity." (A Different Gospel, D.R. McConnell, p. 7) 


(h) Mesmerism

BRIEF HISTORY

An 18th century movement begun in France by the Austrian doctor Franz Anton Mesmer.

HERETICAL DOCTRINES

Anton Mesmer believed that astrological influence on humans was based on a force or substance similar to magnetism. He first began treating patients with magnets or charged fluids but quickly modified his position theorizing that cures were actually coming from an energy or mysterious "magnetic fluid" coming from the hands, voice, or nervous system of the practitioner. This invisible substance or magnetism was thought to be similar to electro-magnetism and was dubbed "Animal Magnetism". Mesmer's pupils were later able to induce a "magnetic sleep" (trance state or hypnotic condition) in their patients. The term Mesmerism eventually became analogous with hypnosis and was linked with both Spiritualism and the Mind Science religions. (The Watchman Expositor, Index Of Cults, 1997, http://www.watchman.org/cat952.htm)

MAJOR ADHERANTS

Anton Mesmer - originator of "mesmerism"
Hypnotists 


(i) Spiritism/Spiritualism

BRIEF HISTORY

Specifically the belief found in many primitive Cultures that inanimate objects, plants and/or animals are possessed by spirits (good or evil) which must be appeased through Occult practices. More generally, the term can refer to any alleged contact with spirits through Occult techniques. (The Watchman Expositor, Index Of Cults, 1997, http://www.watchman.org/cat953.htm)

HERETICAL DOCTRINES

This classification includes trance-mediums, New Age channeling, Edgar Cayce, seances, and Ouija. This form of occultism would also include Satanic groups that believe Satan is a real entity and who attempt to gain supernatural power by contacting, worshipping, or appeasing Satan and/or his demons.

The Occult practice of Spiritualism (Spiritism) is given a new name in the New Age Channeling or trance channeling. Spirit beings, "ascended masters," deceased humans, or animal spirits allegedly communicate important messages by temporarily entering the body and controlling the voice of a host (channel or medium). Most channelers give the same basic message, man is God. (The Watchman Expositor, Index Of Cults, 1997, http://www.watchman.org/cat953.htm)

MAJOR ADHERANTS

Faith healers - William Branham, Aimee McPherson, Kathryn Kuhlman, Benny Hinn
Harry Edwards - The Harry Edwards Spiritual Healing Sanctuary
Allan Kardac - "The Spirit's Book" and "The Book Of Mediums"
Mediums
New Age channelers

LINKS

William Branham

Years ago (William Branham) told his interpreter, Pastor Ruff, "If my angel does not give the sign, I cannot heal." Ruff noticed several features of spiritism in the work of Branham, and therefore stopped working with him. These "angels" of whom (Harry) Edwards and Branham spoke are evil spirits masquerading as angels of light. As in many areas of the occult, we are here reminded again that the devil appears as an angel of light (2 Cor. 11:14) Another evidence is the fact that neither Edwards nor Branham were able to perform cures when faced with born-again Christians who had committed themselves to the protection of Christ. In the case of Branham, I have experienced this myself. When he spoke in Karlsruhe and Lausanne, there were several believers among the audience including myself who prayed along these lines: "Lord, if this man's powers are from You, then bless and use him, but if the healing gifts are not from You, then hinder him." The result? On both occasions Branham said from the platform, "There are disturbing powers here. I can do nothing." (Kurt Koch, Occult ABC, 1978, p. 235)

Kathryn Kuhlman

There is a long report about Kathryn Kuhlman's appearances in Vancouver and Seattle. Lack of space again compels me to mention only the main points. This observer writes, "Kathryn Kuhlman calls herself an instrument of the Lord. In reality, she is a medium of the lord of this world. A person cannot receive a second birth from the Holy Spirit when someone touches his face and says a few words to him. I believe in the charismata gifts of the Spirit. But what Kathryn Kuhlman displays is not a gift of the Holy Spirit of God, but a gift of the spirits who rule in the air. These spirits make use of her, herself deceived and deceiving others ... She is a medium of Satan." (Kurt Koch, Occult ABC, 1978, p. 118)

A well-known professor of theology at the University of Tubingen who has the reputation among believers of being a born-again Christian ... wrote to me, "Kathryn Kuhlman is a spiritist. Twenty years ago you would have said so yourself." (Kurt Koch, Occult ABC, 1978, p. 118)

Benny Hinn

Benny Hinn claims to actually be a channel for God that God enters him and takes over his mind and tongue to the point where he is unaware of what he has said. After his sermon on December 31, 1989, at Orlando Christian Center, during which he gave several future prophecies, Hinn expressed that he was drunk presumably on the Holy Spirit and asked someone to tell him what he had just said. (Biblical Discernment Ministries - 5/92) 


(j) George Fox, founder of the Quakers/Shakers, Friends (deceased)

BRIEF HISTORY

"The term "Quaker" refers to a member of the Religious Society of Friends, which is the proper name of the sect. There are two reputed origins of the term, the first refers to people "quaking" or trembling when feeling moved by the Holy Spirit to speak in Meetings for Worship. The other according to Elfrida Vipont Brown, is: "George Fox was arrested in Derby in October 1650 and charged with blasphemy. The magistrates who tried him were Gervase Bennett and Colonel Nathaniel Barton. George Fox was questioned intermittently over an eight hour period, during which at one point George Fox told the magistrates "Tremble at the word of the Lord". It was Justice Bennett who coined the name "Quakers" for the followers of George Fox." (Quaker FAQ, http://www.jmas.co.jp/FAQs/Quaker-faq)

HERETICAL DOCTRINES

"Quakers (Friends) beliefs are a little hard to quantify, since Friends do not believe in having a fixed Creed or Dogma, but rather in seeking for the leadings of God within ourselves. Some generalizations are possible however: (Other than the titles, the following is largely quoted from: soc.religion.quaker Answers to Frequently asked questions, Obtained from the Society of Friends internet server)

- Doctrines of Jesus' deity and the virgin birth are nonessential and not accepted as fact.

- Primacy of "feelings" over scripture as source of testing doctrine.

- Acceptance of any document as valid for doctrine (i.e. Tao Te Ching, Koran, etc.)

- Unitarian Universalists (by their own description) (i.e. all religions and beliefs are correct and of equal value.)

- Great manifestations including trembling and shaking.

- George Fox saw himself as an apostle restoring the true church." (Quaker FAQ, http://www.jmas.co.jp/FAQs/Quaker-faq)

MAJOR ADHERANTS

Richard Foster, author

LINKS

Quakers

George Fox is deemed to be the "prophet" whose teachings tend to be the prime source of guidance for the philosophy followed in the Quaker faith. 


(k) Azusa Street Revival

BRIEF HISTORY

The Azusa Street Revival began in 1906, with a number of signs and manifestations, such as speaking in tongues and healings. This revival was sound in doctrine, but many of the breakoff or branch movements did not emphasize a strong scriptural foundation, but rather emphasized the manifestations themselves. There is little doubt that the Azusa Street Revival was a true work of God. Many churches with sound doctrinal basis also grew out of the movement but unfortunately, others choose to ignore the scriptural teachings, and thus a number of movements preaching error or cultic doctrines also grew out of some offshoots of this revival. William Seymour was an elder in the Azusa Street Revival, who was criticized for his strong belief that all experience/doctrine needed to be tested against scripture. (Tom Smith, Background To The "Holy Laughter" Movement, 1997, http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/4948/vine3is5.html)

HERETICAL DOCTRINES

The doctrines of the Pentecostals including Oneness Pentecostals, United Pentecostals, Assmeblies of God and other Pentecostal and charismatic organizations developed partly as a result of the Azusa Street Revival.

Rodney Howard Browne commends Charles Parham and William Branham as men of God. Both of these men, as well as the movement that started as a result of Branhams efforts were cut off from credible Christian institutions and movements as follows:

- 1906 Charles Parham "excommunicated" from the Azusa Street revival.

- The Latter Rain movement was forced out of the Assemblies of God church in 1949:(Excerpt from [1]) " These doctrines caused division in traditional Pentecostal churches. They led to the condemnation of the `The New Order of the Latter Rain' by the Assemblies of God in their general council in 1949. After this action, many Assembly ministers resigned or were excommunicated for their involvement and formed independent Latter Rain churches. Most of these churches were small. Their evolving doctrines became increasingly heretical and, many degenerated into clearly definable cults (Church of the Living Word, The Body, House of Prayer, etc.)." (Tom Smith, Background To The "Holy Laughter" Movement, 1997, http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/4948/vine3is5.html)

MAJOR ADHERANTS

Pentecostals
Assemblies Of God
Oneness Pentecostals
United Pentecostals
William Branham

LINKS

Pentecostals

The Pentecostal and the Assemblies of God denominations grew out of the Azusa street Revival. Charles Parham was removed from the movement out of concerns about heretical teachings. (Tom Smith, Background To The "Holy Laughter" Movement, 1997, http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/4948/vine3is5.html)

Assemblies Of God

The Pentecostal and the Assemblies of God denominations grew out of the Azusa street Revival. Charles Parham was removed from the movement out of concerns about heretical teachings. (Tom Smith, Background To The "Holy Laughter" Movement, 1997, http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/4948/vine3is5.html)

Oneness Pentecostals

The United Pentecostal Church (UPC) grew out of the Azusa Street Revival, and is a member of what is commonly known as the Oneness Pentecostal movement. (Tom Smith, Background To The "Holy Laughter" Movement, 1997, 
http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/4948/vine3is5.html)

United Pentecostals

The United Pentecostal Church (UPC) grew out of the Azusa Street Revival, and is a member of what is commonly known as the Oneness Pentecostal movement. (Tom Smith, Background To The "Holy Laughter" Movement, 1997, http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/4948/vine3is5.html)


(l) Quakers, Friends

BRIEF HISTORY

"The term "Quaker" refers to a member of the Religious Society of Friends, which is the proper name of the sect. There are two reputed origins of the term, the first refers to people "quaking" or trembling when feeling moved by the Holy Spirit to speak in Meetings for Worship. The other according to Elfrida Vipont Brown, is: "George Fox was arrested in Derby in October 1650 and charged with blasphemy. The magistrates who tried him were Gervase Bennett and Colonel Nathaniel Barton. George Fox was questioned intermittently over an eight hour period, during which at one point George Fox told the magistrates "Tremble at the word of the Lord". It was Justice Bennett who coined the name "Quakers" for the followers of George Fox." (Quaker FAQ, http://www.jmas.co.jp/FAQs/Quaker-faq)

HERETICAL DOCTRINES

"Quakers beliefs are a little hard to quantify, since Friends do not believe in having a fixed Creed or Dogma, but rather in seeking for the leadings of God within ourselves. Some generalizations are possible however: (Other than the titles, the following is largely quoted from: soc.religion.quaker Answers to Frequently asked questions, Obtained from the Society of Friends internet server)

- Doctrines of Jesus' deity and the virgin birth are nonessential and not accepted as fact.

- Primacy of "feelings" over scripture as source of testing doctrine.

- Acceptance of any document as valid for doctrine (i.e. Tao Te Ching, Koran, etc.)

- Unitarian Universalists (by their own description) (i.e. all religions and beliefs are correct and of equal value.)

- Great manifestations including trembling and shaking.

- George Fox saw himself as an apostle restoring the true church." (Quaker FAQ, http://www.jmas.co.jp/FAQs/Quaker-faq)

It should be mentioned here that certain Friends groups such as the Evangelical Friends no longer subscribe to the heretical beliefs of classic Quakerism.

QUOTES

"At the close of the singing, one of the sisters began to rock to an fro; at first gently, then in a more violent manner, until two of the sisters, on on each side, supported her else she would have fallen to the floor. She appeared to be wholly unconscious of her surroundings, and to be moved by an invisible power. The shaking of the subject continued to increase in violence, and it was with great difficulty that she was restrained from throwing herself forcibly to the floor. Her limbs became rigid, her face took on an ashen hue, her lips moved, and she began to speak in a clear, distinct voice, every word of which penetrated every part of the room, which was as still as death. Every eye was on the recipient of the gift, every ear open to catch each word as it fell from her lips. She spoke of the shortness of life, of the absolute necessity of abandoning the world and its sinful pleasures before it was too late; that in Shakerism were embodied all the virtures and none of the vices of mankind; that through her the spirit of Mother Ann was speaking to every Shaker present to remain steadfast to the faith ..." This is an account that bears comparison with a recent happening in the Brownsville A/G Church of Pensacola, FL, in the early stages of the "revival" there. The Brownsville account is almost identical to the one mentioned here. It is important to note that this Shaker account shows clearly that they had opened themselves up to demonic influence by the use of mediums and necromancy. It is also interesting to note that the message is very much the same in these two accounts. What we read about regarding the Shakers and what we see and hear going on in the "counterfeit" revival are clear indications of spiritism. (Sears, op. cit., p. 201; as cited in The Confusion Of Tongues, Chrales W. Ferguson, 1927, p. 336; with comment by Sandy Simpson)

MAJOR ADHERANTS

Gunner Payne
Richard Foster
John Wimber

LINKS

Gunner Payne

John Wimber began as a Quaker, originally being a member of the Quaker church. George Fox is deemed to be the "prophet" whose teachings tend to be the prime source of guidance for the philosophy followed in the Quaker faith. Gunner Payne was the person who initially had the primary influence in John Wimber's life. 


(m) Pentecostals

BRIEF HISTORY

Pentecostals, in general, are representative of a wide array of Pentecostal denominations which include Oneness Pentecostals and United Pentecostals, among others. The William Branham strain of Pentecostalism was deemed heretical in its time, even though leaders of the current "counterfeit" revival claim Branham as one of their founding prophets and the Oneness Pentecostals as a basis for the doctrines of their movement.

HERETICAL DOCTRINES

The following are the key doctrinal beliefs that distinguish the Oneness Pentecostal movement:

- Doctrine of "trinity" considered to be demonic

- Speaking in tongues is an essential sign of salvation

- Denial of the pre-existence of Christ

- Jesus was Himself the Father

- Modalism - Jesus is the only person of the trinity, but appears in three modes at different times.

- Baptism "in Jesus' name" alone is necessary for salvation.

The following are the key doctrinal beliefs of William Branham:

- God's Word consists of the zodiac, Egyptian pyramids and scripture.

- Doctrine of trinity is considered demonic

- The claim that he was Elijah the prophet

- Millennium to begin in 1977.

- That he was the seventh angelic messenger to the Laodicean Church Age. (Using the dispenational theory that each of the churches in Revelations represents an age of the church, the current one being the Laodicean Church Age).

- That anyone belonging to any denomination had taken "the mark of the beast"

- That he received divinely inspired revelations (The Revelation of the Seven Seals, Branham; Spoken Word Publications, Tucson, Ariz., n.d.; pg.19; Questions and Answers, Book 1, Branham; Spoken Word Publications, Tucson, 1964; pg. 60.)

- The fall of man happened when Eve had sexual relations with Satan, that his sexual union produced Cain.(Branham said that "every sin that ever was on the Earth was caused by a woman....the very lowest creature on the Earth" The Spoken Word, Vol. III Nos. 12, 13, 14;, Branham; Spoken Word Publications, Jeffersonville, Ind. 1976; pp. 81-82. Quoted in The Man and His Message, pg. 41).

- Branham denied the biblical triune Godhead. He pronounced it a "gross error" (The Spoken Word, pg. 79) and as a prophet with the authority of a "Thus saith the Lord," revealed that "trinitarianism is of the devil".

- Unsaved descended from the serpent. (Tom Smith, Background To The "Holy Laughter" Movement, 1997, http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/4948/vine3is5.html)

MAJOR ADHERANTS

William Branham 
Charles Parham
Oneness Pentecostals
United Pentecostals

LINKS

Charles Parham

The Pentecostal denomination grew out of the Azusa street revival. Charles Parham was removed from the movement out of concerns about heretical teachings. (A PROPHET SENT FROM GOD? : Examining the Life and Claims of William M. Branham, Stephen F. Cannon, Personal Freedom Outreach, 1988)

Word-Faith Movement

"... the real father of the `Faith' message is E.W.Kenyon, who was teaching the same things before Kenneth Hagin was even born (Kenyon died in 1948). To the casual observer, the `Faith' movement has certain similarities in experience, etc., to the Pentecostal and charismatic movements. However, the core of the message, and its origins, are widely divergent. Kenyon, its founder, inadvertently `borrowed' from the ideas taught by Christian Science, New Thought and Unity School of Christianity." (A Different Gospel, D.R. McConnell, p. 7) 


(n) Assemblies Of God

BRIEF HISTORY

A Pentecostal denomination which was formed in 1914, eight years after the Azusa Street meetings in Los Angeles, California, from which Pentecostalism traces its roots in this century. As of 1990 the Assemblies of God (AG) had 2,160,000 members, 11,000 churches, 1,530 foreign missionaries, 18 colleges and Bible schools in the United States, and 299 Bible schools abroad (Handbook). (Way Of Life, Encyclopedia, 1997, http://www.wayoflife.org/ency/textency/ency002b.htm)

HERETICAL DOCTRINES

The A/G are evangelical and dispensational and are sound concerning Jesus Christ, the Scriptures, death, resurrection, judgment, Heaven, and Hell. Their major denominational distinctives denote their errors, which are these:

- The baptism of the Holy Spirit is an experience to be sought subsequent to the new birth.

- The baptism and filling of the Holy Spirit are evidenced by tongues' speaking.

- A Christian can lose his salvation.

- Physical healing is promised to the Christian because of Christ's atonement. All of these teachings are contrary to the Word of God.

- Ecumenism: The AG has become increasingly ecumenical during the past fifty years. In 1943, the AG joined the National Association of Evangelicals (NAE). Thomas Zimmerman, formerly the general superintendent of the AG, served two terms as president of the NAE. In 1948 the Assemblies helped form the Pentecostal Fellowship of North America. They have held low-key dialogue with the National Council of Churches and the World Council of Churches.

- Sadly, the AG have also opened their arms to Romanism. The change in attitude toward Roman Catholicism is witnessed in the Assemblies' relationship with the late David du Plessis. In its first 60 years the AG had taught that the pope is of the antichrist, that Roman Catholicism is heresy, that Catholics need to hear the Gospel, and those who are converted need to separate themselves from Romanism. Thus when AG minister David du Plessis began to develop close communications with the Catholic hierarchy, he was forced to submit his resignation in 1962. Du Plessis did not change. He grew so friendly with Rome that he attended the Vatican II Council meetings in the mid-1960s. He was received in audience by three Roman Catholic popesJohn XXIII, Paul VI, and John Paul II. He helped develop the Roman Catholic-Pentecostal dialogues. Rome awarded Du Plessis with the Pax Christi award in 1976 and the Benemerenti award in 1983. Du Plessis did not change, but the AG did. By 1980 the attitude within the AG had changed so radically that du Plessis was welcomed back as a credentialed minister. Today it is common for Catholic priests to speak in AG churches and for AG leaders to participate with Catholics in ecumenical meetings. (Way Of Life, Encyclopedia, 1997, http://www.wayoflife.org/ency/textency/ency002b.htm#002B_011C)

The Assemblies Of God has forced a number of heretical teachers from its ranks in the past, which is to their credit. However, the Pensacola "Outpouring" started at Brownsville A/G church in Pensacola, FL is fully sanctioned by Thomas Trask, General Superintendant of the A/G: "First, let me say that the Brownsville Assembly of God in Pensacola, Florida, is an outstanding church that has been in a sovereign move of the Spirit now for many months ... My appraisal of what is taking place is that where strong leadership is in place, there is a wonderful outpouring of the Holy Spirit with good balance." (Thomas Trask, General Superintendant of the A/G, The Official Response, 1997, http://www.deceptioninthechurch.com/general.htm, with comment by Sandy Simpson)

LINKS

Latter Rain Movement

"Over 50 years ago, William Branham, George Warnock, Paul Cain and others attempted to introduce Latter Rain/Manifest Sons of God teachings into the Pentecostal movement. In 1949, however, the Assemblies of God officially rejected the Latter Rain/ Manifest Sons of God doctrine as "heresy." The cult went underground but surfaced again in the 1960's as the Manchild Company. Disregarding the Assemblies of God decision, Paul Cain, the Kansas City Prophets and Vineyard Ministries have subsequently reintroduced and successfully established this false doctrine in the Pentecostal churches." (The Latter Rain Revival by Tim Barbaho, 1997, http://watch.pair.com/rain.html)

After the Assemblies of God denounced this (Latter Rain) movement and excommunicated some ministers it died down as a movement per se. Yet its heretical teachings were never abandoned and they took root in the Charismatic Renewal Movement of 1967, the Discipleship/Shepherding Movement, and all of the other alleged moves of the Holy Spirit, up to an including the Holy Laughter Movement in Toronto which has some of the original N. Battleford people involved in it. (Restoration "The Latter Rain Movement" by Rev. Robert S. Liichow, 1997, http://www.discernment.org/restorat.htm)

"... how has the Latter Rain revival come to influence Pentecostals and Charismatics today? Most Christians think that particular movement died out in the 1950's when it was banished from the Pentecostal denominations. However, the Latter Rain doctrines did not die - they just went underground, as this quote from Bill Hamon's book, "The Eternal Church" illustrates. Bill Hamon traces spiritual movements that he believes restored the Church progressively from its dark ages. He comes to the "Fourth Doctrine" restored, that of the "laying-on-of-hands", not for healing but for the transference of the anointing and gifts: "The Laying on of Hands produced another major movement. This movement started in the late 1940's and infiltrated into EVERY PENTECOSTAL GROUP in the 1950's. During this time, it was known as the Latter Rain and Revival Movement. In the early 1960's, very few Christians were knowledgeable of the movement except Pentecostal churches which had been affected by it. However, in the mid 1960's, the Holy Spirit had spread the truths and spiritual experiences of the restoration doctrine into every church groups within Christendom. The move of the Spirit which took the four restoration doctrines of Hebrews 6:1-2 and made them known to all Church denominations and independent groups became known as the Charismatic Movement". It was the Charismatic Movement that provided a home for Latter Rain teachings, according to its own proponents." (The New Thing by Tricia Tillin, 1997,  http://www.banner.org.uk/res/newthing_cont.html )

Manifest Sons Of God

"In 1948, the Assemblies of God confronted and denounced the extremes of the Latter Rain Movement, and teachers among them fell into disrepute. Not many would want to openly admit to being of the Latter Rain or it's offshoot, the Manifested Sons. In fact, people balk at those labels to this day. However, the doctrines and concepts of this heresy have continued to be promoted, frequently recurring under different names, but using the same premises. When a Charismatic Bible teacher, or media personality prophesies of that "great end time army," that will "take nations for God," and "usher in the kingdom of God!" or give birth to the "next revival," call him a Manifested Sons teacher and see what he does. Usually they balk, because of the scandal and some of the extremes associated with those titles, but in effect, that is what they are espousing!" (Weighed And Found Wanting, Bill Randles, 1997, http://www.hutch.com.au/~rlister/charis/randles/randle4.htm )

Kingdom Now

"We've been foolishly waiting for Christ to come "for us" and all the while, He's been wanting to "come within us." That, in a nutshell, is the philosophy of the Manifested Sons of God. You have all heard it in some form or another. If not called Latter Rain, it's come to you in the shepherding movement. There are many different Charismatic strains of it including Word Faith, Kingdom Now, Dominion, The Prophetic Move, and of course, this laughing "revival." As Bill Hamon says, "The earth and all of creation is waiting for the manifestation of the sons of God, the time when they will come into their maturity and immortalization...The church has a responsibility and ministry to the rest of creation. Earth and its natural creation is anxiously waiting for the church to reach full maturity and come to full sonship. When the church realizes it's full sonship, it's bodily redemption will cause a redemptive chain reaction throughout all creation." (Weighed And Found Wanting, Bill Randles, 1997, http://www.hutch.com.au/~rlister/charis/randles/randle4.htm)

Restoration Movement

"All the great outpourings of the past have had their outstanding truths. Luthur's truth was Justification by Faith. Wesley's was Sanctification. The Baptists taught the premillenial [sic] coming of Christ. The Missionary Alliance taught Divine Healing. The Pentecostal outpouring has restored the Baptism of the Holy Ghost to its rightful place. But the next great outpouring is going to be marked by all these other truths plus such a demonstration of the nine gifts of the Spirit as the world, not even the Apostolic world, has ever witnessed before. This revival will be short and will be the last before the Rapture of the Church." (Riss, Richard M., Latter Rain, Honeycomb Visual Productions, pg. 56-57) This paragraph has been restated and echoed for the last fifty years (in the Pentecostal and charismatic movements). It is significant because it details the restoration concept now held by the Word of Faith Movement, the Prophetic Movement, The Signs and Wonder Movement, and the Apostolic Movement. (Restoration "The Latter Rain Movement" by Rev. Robert S. Liichow, 1997, http://www.discernment.org/restorat.htm)

Joel's Army

"In some Christian circles today, the "peer pressure" upon leaders to accept this (Joel's Army) movement (or at least to keep any qualms about it to themselves) has been quite incredible at times. I have to say that I have been utterly staggered that such an obviously suspect and `strange' movement has been able to sweep through the church so easily, when the Bible clearly warns us in the last days to BEWARE OF DECEPTION, AND ESPECIALLY OF "LYING SIGNS AND WONDERS"! Surely it is obvious that we are now paying a heavy price for all the shallowness and experience-centred soulishness that we have sown in the years of the Charismatic Movement. God has indeed seemingly given the Laodicean church over to believe a lie, a "strong delusion", and millions are now falling prey." (THE TRUTH ABOUT JOEL'S ARMY)


(o) Oneness Pentecostals

BRIEF HISTORY

A heresy that emerged from the mainstream Pentecostal movement of the early 19th century. Unlike traditional Pentecostals, "Oneness" followers deny the doctrine of the Trinity in favor of Modalism. In addition to this heresy, most Oneness Pentecostal organizations also teach that speaking in tongues, baptism (in Jesus' name only), and maintaining various moral "standards" are necessary for salvation. (The Watchman Expositor, Index, 1997, http://www.watchman.org/cat952.htm)

HERETICAL DOCTRINES

The following are the key doctrinal beliefs that distinguish the Oneness Pentecostal movement:

- Doctrine of "trinity" considered to be demonic

- Speaking in tongues is an essential sign of salvation

- Denial of the pre-existence of Christ

- Jesus was Himself the Father

- Modalism - Jesus is the only person of the trinity, but appears in three modes at different times.

- Baptism "in Jesus' name" alone is necessary for salvation. (Tom Smith, Background To The "Holy Laughter" Movement, 1997, http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/4948/vine3is5.html)

LINKS

United Pentecostals

"(Modalism is) a second and third century heresy that denies the doctrine of the Trinity, teaching there is only one Person in the Godhead. While the Trinity doctrine teaches three distinct Persons, Modalism maintains that one Person (usually the Father) has manifested Himself at different times under different names (Jesus/Spirit) or modes. Thus, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost are three names for the same Person. Originally taught in various forms by Noetus, Praxeas and Sabellius. Modified forms of this doctrine can be found in the teachings of William Branham, some Apostolic churches and the United Pentecostal Church." (The Watchman Expositor, Index, 1997, http://www.watchman.org/cat952.htm#Modalism)


(p) Charles Parham, founder of Pentecostalism (deceased)

BRIEF HISTORY

1906 Charles Parham "excommunicated" from the Azusa Street revival.

"Charles Fox Parham who is the father of the contemporary Pentecostal movement, came to the conviction originally (this is way back at the turn of the century when the Charismatic movement was then known as Pentecostalism and just starting) he claimed that God desired all believers to have complete healing and he developed that into an entire Pentecostal system, and then it began to flow through the leaders." ("Does God Still Heal?", John MacArthur, 1997, http://www.deceptioninthechurch.com/chaos9.htm)

"Rodney Howard-Browne speaks glowingly of Charles Parham, apparently unaware that Parham was thrown out of the Azusa Street work in 1906 and banned from that time on. Parham spent the rest of his days denouncing W.J. Seymour and the Azusa Street revival." (see Synan, "The Holiness Pentecostal Movement", pg. 112).

HERETICAL DOCTRINES

- Doctrine of "trinity" considered to be demonic

- Speaking in tongues is an essential sign of salvation

- Denial of the pre-existence of Christ

- Jesus was Himself the Father

- Modalism - Jesus is the only person of the trinity, but appears in three modes at different times.

- Baptism "in Jesus' name" alone is necessary for salvation. (Tom Smith, Background To The "Holy Laughter" Movement, 1997, http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/4948/vine3is5.html)


(q) United Pentecostal Church

BRIEF HISTORY

The UPC grew out of the Azusa street revival, and is a member of what is commonly known as the Oneness Pentecostal movement.

HERETICAL DOCTRINES

The following are the key doctrinal beliefs that distinguish the Oneness Pentecostal movement:

- Doctrine of "trinity" considered to be demonic

- Speaking in tongues is an essential sign of salvation

- Denial of the pre-existence of Christ

- Jesus was Himself the Father

- Modalism - Jesus is the only person of the trinity, but appears in three modes at different times.

- Baptism "in Jesus' name" alone is necessary for salvation.

LINKS

Latter Rain Movement

"Over 50 years ago, William Branham, George Warnock, Paul Cain and others attempted to introduce Latter Rain/Manifest Sons of God teachings into the Pentecostal movement. In 1949, however, the Assemblies of God officially rejected the Latter Rain/Manifest Sons of God doctrine as "heresy." The cult went underground but surfaced again in the 1960's as the Manchild Company. Disregarding the Assemblies of God decision, Paul Cain, the Kansas City Prophets and Vineyard Ministries have subsequently reintroduced and successfully established this false doctrine in the Pentecostal churches." (The Latter Rain Revival by Tim Barbaho, 1997, http://watch.pair.com/rain.html)

Manifest Sons Of God

"Over 50 years ago, William Branham, George Warnock, Paul Cain and others attempted to introduce Latter Rain/Manifest Sons of God teachings into the Pentecostal movement. In 1949, however, the Assemblies of God officially rejected the Latter Rain/Manifest Sons of God doctrine as "heresy." The cult went underground but surfaced again in the 1960's as the Manchild Company. Disregarding the Assemblies of God decision, Paul Cain, the Kansas City Prophets and Vineyard Ministries have subsequently reintroduced and successfully established this false doctrine in the Pentecostal churches." (The Latter Rain Revival by Tim Barbaho, 1997, http://watch.pair.com/rain.html)

Kingdom Now

"Christian humanism has gripped the English-speaking world by means of the Wesleyan movement (Methodism), and Methodism's first and second generation heirsthe Holiness and Pentecostal movements, the out-of-control Charismatic Movement ... Recently, new variations of Christian humanism have emergede.g. the Word-Faith & Kingdom Now, Latter Rain, Third Wave Movement and `New Age' Christianity, so-called. Strangely, a convergence is beginning to form between secular humanists who are dabbling in New Age occult spirituality and `New Age' Christians." (The Unholy Alliance by Dan S., 1997, was at http://www.ezlink.com/%7Etrbranch/unholy.htm now available here)

Restoration Movement

"All the great outpourings of the past have had their outstanding truths. Luthur's truth was Justification by Faith. Wesley's was Sanctification. The Baptists taught the premillenial [sic] coming of Christ. The Missionary Alliance taught Divine Healing. The Pentecostal outpouring has restored the Baptism of the Holy Ghost to its rightful place. But the next greatoutpouring is going to be marked by all these other truths plus such a demonstration of the nine gifts of the Spirit as the world, not even the Apostolic world, has ever witnessed before. This revival will be short and will be the last before the Rapture of the Church." (Riss, Richard M., Latter Rain, Honeycomb Visual Productions, pg. 56-57) This paragraph has been restated and echoed for the last fifty years (in the Pentecostal and charismatic movements). It is significant because it details the restoration concept now held by the Word of Faith Movement, the Prophetic Movement, The Signs and Wonder Movement, and the Apostolic Movement. (Restoration "The Latter Rain Movement" by Rev. Robert S. Liichow, 1997, http://www.discernment.org/restorat.htm)

All The Above Movements

These movements are built upon the same foundation: the neo-Pentecostalism of the mid-twentieth century. They draw from one another the support needed to develop their strategy for gaining preeminence among Christians. All zealously propagate their "new revelations" which allegedly are to prepare the Church for "the next move of God," bringing us closer to the Kingdom Age (the rule of God on earth). The most prominent of these movements are:

- Latter Rain
- Identity
- Manifest Sons of God
- Restoration
- Reconstruction
- Charismatic Renewal
- Shepherding/Discipleship
- Kingdom Message
- Positive Confession (Kingdom Theology, Albert James Dager, 1986, http://www.contenders.com/kingdom1.htm)

Joel's Army

"Today's prophets fall pretty much follow the doctrines and beliefs of the New Order of the Latter Rain (LR). This is especially true for Paul Cain, John Sandford, Rick Joyner, Mike Bickle, Bill Hamon, Jefferson Edwards, Turnel Nelson, Myles Monroe, and many other international charismatic leaders. A central thought of LR doctrine is the belief that God is raising up an army that will manifest all the supernatural power of the Old Testament and the New Testament combined. This power will be manifested to bring the entire world under the dominion of the Church. The Church will then in turn hand it over to Jesus, who will hand it over to His Father. The great conquering army of supernatural saints is commonly referred to as Joel's Army or the Manchild company." (The Prophetic Movement, Rev. Robert S. Liichow, 1997, http://www.discernment.org/prophet.htm)

William Branham

Branham started off as a Baptist and then changed over to a Oneness Pentecostal. (Robert S. Liichow, William M. Branham, 1997, http://www.discernment.org/precedin.htm)

"(Modalism is) a second and third century heresy that denies the doctrine of the Trinity, teaching there is only one Person in the Godhead. While the Trinity doctrine teaches three distinct Persons, Modalism maintains that one Person (usually the Father) has manifested Himself at different times under different names (Jesus/Spirit) or modes. Thus, Father, Son, and Holy Ghost are three names for the same Person. Originally taught in various forms by Noetus, Praxeas and Sabellius. Modified forms of this doctrine can be found in the teachings of William Branham, some Apostolic churches and the United Pentecostal Church." (The Watchman Expositor, Index, 1997, http://www.watchman.org/cat952.htm#Modalism)


(r) Gunner Payne, Quaker/Freinds pastor

BRIEF HISTORY

George Fox is deemed to be the "prophet" whose teachings tend to be the prime source of guidance for the philosophy followed in the Quaker faith. Gunner Payne was the person who initially had the primary influence in John Wimber's life. (Tom Smith, Background To The "Holy Laughter" Movement, 1997, http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/4948/vine3is5.html)

(Wimber) eventually began attending a Bible study group led by a Quaker, Gunner Payne, who became somewhat of a mentor to them, for a period, in the things of God. (The Roots: John Wimber and the Vineyard, Bob Hunter, 1997, http://www.contenders.com/9.htm)

HERETICAL DOCTRINES

Gunner Payne, being a Friend (Quaker) held to some of the heretical doctrines of the Quakers:

"Quakers (Friends) beliefs are a little hard to quantify, since Friends do not believe in having a fixed Creed or Dogma, but rather in seeking for the leadings of God within ourselves. Some generalizations are possible however: (Other than the titles, the following is largely quoted from: soc.religion.quaker Answers to Frequently asked questions, Obtained from the Society of Friends internet server)

- Doctrines of Jesus' deity and the virgin birth are nonessential and not accepted as fact.

- Primacy of "feelings" over scripture as source of testing doctrine.

- Acceptance of any document as valid for doctrine (i.e. Tao Te Ching, Koran, etc.)

- Unitarian Universalists (by their own description) (i.e. all religions and beliefs are correct and of equal value.)

- Great manifestations including trembling and shaking.

- George Fox saw himself as an apostle restoring the true church." (Quaker FAQ, http://www.jmas.co.jp/FAQs/Quaker-faq)

LINKS

John Wimber

Gunner Payne was the person who initially had the primary influence in John Wimber's life. (Tom Smith, Background To The "Holy Laughter" Movement, 1997, http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/4948/vine3is5.html)


(s) Word-Faith Movement (Prosperity Doctrine/Positive Confession)

BRIEF HISTORY

Word-Faith is the fastest-growing movement within the professing church. It has involved two distinct but closely related factions: the Peale/Schuller Positive/Possibility thinkers, with their roots in New Thought, and the Hagin/Copeland Positive Confession and Word-Faith groups, which have their roots in E.W. Kenyon, William Branham, and the Manifest Sons of God/Latter Rain Movement. (Charismatic Chaos , p. 281).

Popular today, but coexisted with, and grew out of the Latter Rain movement. Tends to be predominantly trinitarian, as opposed to the Latter Rain movement, but hold to the primary doctrines put forward by William Branham, and most leaders in this movement uphold Branham as a man of God or prophet. (Christianity in Crisis, Hank Hanegraaf, Harvest House, 1993)

HERETICAL DOCTRINES

Because of the diverse nature of the movement, the doctrines listed below are representative of those held widely or predominantly throughout the leadership of the movement.

Doctrines:

- Christians are "gods", and therefore do not need to ask "in God's will", but rather use our own divinity to speak what we want into being.

- We are lacking faith if we are not healthy and wealthy. (God intended for us to be rich and healthy).

- Men are capable of saving themselves.

- Belief in faith as a "force" capable of being used for good or evil.

- Use of faith-force to change reality or to create through visualization

- God is unable to operate within the earth realm without our help

- Use of words (negative) releases Satan's power, while words (positive) release God's power.

- See Also Manifest Sons of God; and William Branham. Other than the acceptance of trinitarianism by the Word-Faith movement, the doctrines in these notes tend to be fairly representative of the Word-Faith movement.

Names associated with this movement:

Kenneth Copeland, Kenneth Hagin, Benny Hinn, Paul Crouch, Oral Roberts, Richard Roberts, E. W. Kenyon, Earl Paulk. (Christianity in Crisis, Hank Hanegraaf, Harvest House, 1993)

LINKS

Essek Kenyon

"D.R. McConnell, in his book, "A Different Gospel," directly traces the origin the spiritual laws taught in positive confession to the metaphysics of E.W. Kenyon, a man of 50-60 years ago whose theology was that of Pentecostal Christian Science." ( A Different Gospel, pp. 3-56).

"As we proceed to examine the primary purveyors of Faith theology, we will see living proof of the maxim that "error begets error and heresy begets heresy." If, for example, one examines the cultic progression of E. W. Kenyon's theology, one will discover that his original deviations from orthodox Christianity were minor compared to those that characterized the later stages of his ministry. And with each of Kenyon's successive disciples, the errors become even more pronounced. (What's Wrong With The Faith Movement, Hank Hanegraaff, 1993, http://www.iclnet.org/pub/resources/text/cri/cri-jrnl/crj0118a.txt)

Kenneth Hagin

"As we proceed to examine the primary purveyors of Faith theology, we will see living proof of the maxim that "error begets error and heresy begets heresy." ... And with each of Kenyon's successive disciples, the errors become even more pronounced. Hagin, who popularized and plagiarized Kenyon prolifically, not only expanded Kenyon's perversions but added to them as well. (See D. R. McConnell, A Different Gospel (Peabody, MA: Hendrickson Publishers, 1988), 3-14.)

Kenneth Copeland

"As we proceed to examine the primary purveyors of Faith theology, we will see living proof of the maxim that "error begets error and heresy begets heresy." ... And with each of Kenyon's successive disciples, the errors become even more pronounced ...The progression from bad to worse has continued with people like Kenneth Copeland and Charles Capps, and is now reaching heretical heights that are almost inconceivable through ministry leaders like Frederick Price, Benny Hinn, and Robert Tilton. (What's Wrong With The Faith Movement, Hank Hanegraaff, 1993, http://www.iclnet.org/pub/resources/text/cri/cri-jrnl/crj0118a.txt)

John Avanzini

John Avanzini is billed by his Faith peers as a recognized authority on biblical economics. The truth, however, is that Avanzini is an authority on perverting Scripture as a means to picking the pockets of the poor. He has honed his craft into such an art form that when Faith teachers need money, they inevitably call on "Brother John." Armed with a bag full of Bible-twisting tricks, he tells the unsuspecting that "a greater than a lottery has come. His name is Jesus!" (John Avanzini, "Praise-a-Thon" (television program), TBN, April 1991.)

Paul Crouch

" ...Crouch refers to the Faith message as a "revival of truth . . . restored by a few precious men." (Paul Crouch, "Praise the Lord," TBN, 18 February 1986, rebroadcast on 6 August 1991.)

Morris Cerrulo

"On one occasion, (Faith teacher) Cerullo informed his audience, "You're not looking at Morris Cerullo you're looking at God. You're looking at Jesus." Not only is Cerullo a master of make-believe, he is also a master of manipulation. Claiming that God was directly speaking through him, Cerullo uttered, "Would you surrender your pocketbooks unto Me, saith God, and let me be the Lord of your pocketbooks....Yea, so be thou obedient unto my voice." (Morris Cerullo, "The Endtime Manifestation of the Sons of God" (San Diego: Morris Cerullo World Evangelism, n.d.), tape 1, sides 1 and 2., Morris Cerullo, "A Word from God at the Deeper Life World Conference," "Deeper Life," March 1982, 15., as cited in What's Wrong With The Faith Movement, Hank Hanegraaff, 1993, http://www.iclnet.org/pub/resources/text/cri/cri-jrnl/crj0118a.txt)

Marilyn Hickey

Faith teachers such as Robert Tilton and his female counterpart,Marilyn Hickey, have copied many of the scams pioneered by Pentecostal preachers such as Oral Roberts and A. A. Allen. In fact, Tilton and Hickey have managed to exceed even their predecessors' outrageous ploys. This is hard to believe when one considers what sort of schemes they had to outdo. ("What's Wrong With The Faith Movement Part One: E. W. Kenyon and the Twelve Apostles of Another Gospel" (an article from the Christian Research Journal, Winter 1993, page 16) by Hendrik H. Hanegraaff.)

Benny Hinn

"As we proceed to examine the primary purveyors of Faith theology, we will see living proof of the maxim that "error begets error and heresy begets heresy." ... And with each of Kenyon's successive disciples, the errors become even more pronounced ...The progression from bad to worse has continued with people like Kenneth Copeland and Charles Capps, and is now reaching heretical heights that are almost inconceivable through ministry leaders like Frederick Price, Benny Hinn, and Robert Tilton. (What's Wrong With The Faith Movement, Hank Hanegraaff, 1993, http://www.iclnet.org/pub/resources/text/cri/cri-jrnl/crj0118a.txt)

Rodney Howard-Browne

"RHB's biography claims that he served as an associate pastor at Rhema (Kenneth Hagin's Rhema Bible Church) ... " (Tom Smith, Background To The "Holy Laughter" Movement, 1997, http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/4948/vine3is5.html)

Kenneth E. Hagin was the founder of the RHEMA Bible Church movement, along with being one of the key leaders in the Word-Faith movement. A letter from the Rhema Bible Church, Rhema Ministries, South Africa, shows Rodney Howard-Browne's background in the Rhema Bible Church movement: "Rodney attended RBTC [Rhema Bible Training Centre] here in South Africa from where he graduated in 1983. After that he started a Rhema church at Molteno in North-Western Cape where he pastored for two years. He then came back to RBTC where he lectured from 1985 to 1987." (Watching The New Wave, Sure Hope SA Inc., 1995, http://www.hutch.com.au/~rlister/charis/newwave.htm)

Aimee Semple McPherson

"You have no business being sick - everyone of you should get well and get up and go to work, huh? Get up and go to work and earn some money and help send the gospel out! Amen! (This Is My Task, A sermon by Aimee Semple McPherson, Given at Angelus Temple, in Los Angeles, California, March 12, 1939)

John Kilpatrick

Paul Crouch, Word-Faith guru and TBN president said: "The first evidence to many of us was the great stirring of the Spirit in Toronto, Canada, about two years ago. Then, spontaneous revival broke out in Pensacola, Florida. Hungry souls sometimes wait in line all day just to get into the services at Brownsville Assembly of God Church (where John Kilpatrick is the head pastor). Signs, wonders and miracles, just like the Book of Acts, are happening there and many other places at home and abroad!" (Paul Crouch, live on TBN, August 1997)

John Kilpatrick said: "I turned on TBN (home of Word-Faith teachers) not long after that, and some of the very people that turned me off, all of a sudden I looked at them with different eyes, because I had repented, and I looked at them with different eyes and they ministered to me and I broke and wept in my living room before the Lord. God touched my heart. And I had to humble myself down like a little boy and learn again to receive from the Lord. I had to learn to receive from people again. (John Kilpatrick, Brownsville Assembly of God videotape, May 30, 1997)

Brother Kenneth Hagen and Brother Kenneth Copeland have done an excellent job along with others on teaching us about the authority of the believer. (Glory on Your House, John Kilpatrick


(t) Willam Branham, faith healer and evangelist (deceased)

BRIEF HISTORY

Started out with Missionary Baptist church. After a short stint, he joined the United Pentecostal Church (Oneness Pentecostals). He later rejected all denominations as being of the antichrist and formed the Branham Tabernacle as an independent church.

HERETICAL DOCTRINES

His teachings included:

- God's Word consists of the zodiac, Egyptian pyramids and scripture.

- Doctrine of trinity is considered demonic

- The claim that he was Elijah the prophet

- Millennium to begin in 1977.

- That he was the seventh angelic messenger to the Laodicean Church Age. (Using the dispenational theory that each of the churches in Revelations represents an age of the church, the current one being the Laodicean Church Age).

- That anyone belonging to any denomination had taken "the mark of the beast"

- That he received divinely inspired revelations (The Revelation of the Seven Seals, Branham; Spoken Word Publications, Tucson, Ariz., n.d.; pg.19; Questions and Answers, Book 1, Branham; Spoken Word Publications, Tucson, 1964; pg. 60.)

- The fall of man happened when Eve had sexual relations with Satan, that his sexual union produced Cain.(Branham said that "every sin that ever was on the Earth was caused by a woman....the very lowest creature on the Earth" The Spoken Word, Vol. III Nos. 12, 13, 14;, Branham; Spoken Word Publications, Jeffersonville, Ind. 1976; pp. 81-82. Quoted in The Man and His Message, pg. 41).

- Branham denied the biblical triune Godhead. He pronounced it a "gross error" (The Spoken Word, pg. 79) and as a prophet with the authority of a "Thus saith the Lord," revealed that "trinitarianism is of the devil".

- Unsaved descended from the serpent. (Tom Smith, Background To The "Holy Laughter" Movement, 1997, http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Plains/4948/vine3is5.html)

QUOTES

See quotes by or about William Branham in "By Your Words - Quotes By Third Wave Leaders"

LINKS

Latter Rain Movement

"Along with Branham another figure played an important role in formulating what came to be known as Latter Rain Doctrine, that was a man named Franklin Hall." (Restoration "The Latter Rain Movement", Rev. Robert S. Liichow, 1997, http://www.discernment.org/restorat.htm)

(In ) 1947 William Branham/Hawtin/Hunt begin to teach New Order of the Latter Rain codify teachings into doctrines. (Restoration "The Latter Rain Movement", Rev. Robert S. Liichow, 1997, http://www.discernment.org/restorat.htm)

Manifest Sons Of God

In 1948, Branham, a Baptist preacher turned Pentecostal, and influenced by Franklin Hall, gained notoriety for his teachings on what he called, "God's Seventh Church Age" (supposedly the final move of God before the manifestation of His Kingdom on earth). (Kingdom Theology, Albert James Dager, 1986, http://www.contenders.com/kingdom1.htm)

Among those present at the Sharon Camp Meeting in July, 1948, was George Warnock who at one time had been personal secretary to Ern Baxter (an associate with William Branham's healing ministry). At this meeting one of the teachers, James Watt, made a passing remark that the third of Israel's feasts, the Feast of Tabernacles, was yet to be fulfilled. This struck Warnock and he began to associate it with the end-time ministry of the Church, and the concept of restoration. In the fall of 1949 Warnock took up residence at Sharon, "assisting in the office work, and helping in the Bible School and in the local church." (Richard Riss, `The Latter Rain Movement of 1948 and the Mid-twentieth Century Evangelical Awakening' (Vancouver, B.C.: Thesis), p.104)

In 1951 Warnock wrote his book, `The Feast of Tabernacles,' in which he layed out a specific doctrine for the Latter Rain Movement, and those who came after. He taught that the Church was about to usher in the completion of God's feasts for Israel, through perfection of the saints and their dominion over the earth. Essentially, this Latter Rain teaching implies that the three great annual feasts of the Lord in Israel's worship (Passover, Pentecost, and Tabernacles) pre-figure and typify the whole Church Age, beginning with the death of Jesus on the cross, and consummating in "the manifestation of the Sons of God" - the "overcomers" who will step into immortality and establish the Kingdom of God on earth. (George Warnock, `The Feast of Tabernacles' (Cranbrook, B.C.: George Warnock, 1951), p.14-20)

Kingdom Now

Among most major proponents of Kingdom Theology these men are considered the great reformers of the various stages of Church history. To many Kingdom Theology proponents William Branham was perhaps the greatest "prophet" for the Church's final age. (Kingdom Theology, Albert James Dager, 1986, http://www.contenders.com/kingdom2.htm)

Restoration Movement

In his teachings on Joel 2:23, Branham defined the "latter rain" as the Pentecostal movement of his day. God's promise to restore what the locust, cankerworm, caterpillar, and palmerworm had eaten, he defined as the "restoration" of the Church out of denominationalism (which he equated with "the Mark of the Beast"). (Kingdom Theology, Albert James Dager, 1986, http://www.contenders.com/kingdom2.htm)

Joel's Army

"Today's prophets fall pretty much follow the doctrines and beliefs of the New Order of the Latter Rain (that William Branham developed). This is especially true for Paul Cain, John Sandford, Rick Joyner, Mike Bickle, Bill Hamon, Jefferson Edwards, Turnel Nelson, Myles Monroe, and many other international charismatic leaders. A central thought of LR doctrine is the belief that God is raising up an army that will manifest all the supernatural power of the Old Testament and the New Testament combined. This power will be manifested to bring the entire world under the dominion of the Church. The Church will then in turn hand it over to Jesus, who will hand it over to His Father. The great conquering army of supernatural saints is commonly referred to as Joel's Army or the Manchild company." (The Prophetic Movement, Rev. Robert S. Liichow, 1997, http://www.discernment.org/prophet.htm)

Benny Hinn

"Latter Rain doctrine (whose father is William Branham) is a modern version of the classic heresy of Gnosticism, which taught that a spiritual elite possessed "hidden knowledge" of the divine realm which placed their personal revelations, spiritual experiences, and private interpretation of Scripture above the ordinary revelation of God's Word. In Latter Rain doctrine, Pentecost was the "former rain" or outpouring of the Holy Spirit and the Church must yet receive a second Holy Spirit visitation. At this time, the Sons of God will be glorified and manifested to all as they establish the Kingdom on earth before Jesus Christ returns bodily. Latter Rain prophets are now preparing multitudes for this transformation. In a 1991 program entitled "Manifested Sons of God," Morris Cerullo flattered his audience with the following blasphemy, "You represent all that God is and all that God has...Jesus was the visible expression of God. Jesus was the Son of the Living God. Now, who are you? Sons of Godeveryone say it. What is working inside of us is the manifestation. When you look at me, you are looking at JesusTo see Jesus was to see God. To see me is to see Jesus. Jesus knew who He was. Don't you think it is about time we know who we are?" Benny Hinn fills convention centers worldwide preaching a similar message, which exalts the creature rather than the Creator, and induces spiritual pride: "This spirit-man within me is a God-man. Say after me, he's born of heaven, he's a super-beingSay I'm born of heaven - God-man. I'm a God-man. I'm a sample of Jesus. I'm a super being. Say it! Say it! Who's a super being? I walk in the realm of the supernatural. Get the spirit-man renewedwhen he's strong, he'll hold off sicknessyou want to prosper? Money will be falling on you from left, right and center. God will begin to prosper you, for money always follows righteousnessSay after me, I hold my destiny." ("Joel's Army," Jewel van der Merwe, Discernment Ministries, redeemed@tir.com)

"Hagin and Copeland are not alone in affirming Branham; Faith proponent Benny Hinn gives him a hearty "thumbs up" as well." (Benny Hinn, Praise the Lord (television program), Trinity Broadcasting Network (TBN), 12 April 1991)

Paul Cain

"Though Branham denied the historic, orthodox view of the Trinity, William Branham was the greatest prophet in the 20th century. This was due not to Branham's doctrines but to "his gifting in the word of knowledge." (Paul Cain, Armstrong in Michael Horton ed. Power Religion, 1992, p.67)

"Paul Cain - later to re-emerge as head of the Kansas City prophets in 1989 and to become one of the guiding lights of the present renewal also travelled with William Branham and called him "the greatest prophet that ever lived". (Tricia Tillin, The New Thing, 1997, http://www.banner.org.uk/res/newthing_cont.html )

Word-Faith Movement

"... both Kenneth Copeland and Kenneth Hagin point to T. L. Osborn and William Branham

Elfrida Vipont Collection

Date range: c.1910–90.

Personal collection of Elfrida Vipont Foulds née Brown (1902–92), writer of Quaker and children’s literature.

Vipont was born in Manchester and attended Manchester High School for Girls. She read history at the University of Manchester, but did not complete her degree, choosing to pursue a career as a professional singer.

In 1926 Vipont married the research chemist R. Percy Foulds. On the outbreak of the Second World War the family moved to the north Lancashire village of Yealand Conyers, where she taught at a Quaker school for evacuee children.

She wrote extensively for children, notably TheLark in the Morn (1948) and TheLark on the Wing (1950), which won the Library Association Carnegie Medal, but her most famous book for children was The Elephant and the Bad Baby (Hamish Hamilton, 1969), illustrated by Raymond Briggs.

Vipont also wrote on Quaker subjects, including The Story of Quakerism, 1652-1952, and a biography of George Fox.

The collection contains manuscript and typescript copies of:

  • published and unpublished works
  • correspondence with publishers, memoranda of agreements, royalty statements and other papers concerning her writings
  • letters from admiring readers, many of them children
  • papers relating to her other interests in music and Quakerism
  • childhood writings and later reminiscences about her childhood
  • audio dictation tapes
  • newspaper cuttings
  • copies of her published books and articles
  • ephemera.

Finding aids

  • Uncatalogued.
  • For further information see Brenda J. Scragg, 'Elfrida Vipont: Quaker Children's Writer', Bulletin of the John Rylands University Library of Manchester, vol. 76, no. 3 (1994), pp. 249-65.

Location

The John Rylands Library

Using the reading rooms in the John Rylands Library

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